Making the Self: In Conversation with Catherine Fatima

Catherine Fatima’s debut novel, Sludge Utopia, is an auto-fictional novel about sex, depression, family, shaky ethics, ideal forms of life, girlhood, and coaching oneself into adulthood under capitalism. Using her compulsive reading as a lens through which to bring coherence to her life, twenty-five-year-old Catherine engages in a series of sexual relationships, thinking that desire

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Feverish: In Conversation with Mallory Tater

Vancouver poet Mallory Tater’s debut poetry collection, This Will Be Good, tells the story of a young woman’s burgeoning femininity as it brushes up against an emerging eating disorder. As the difficulties of her disease reveal themselves, they ultimately disrupt family relationships and friendships. These poems deftly bear witness to the performance of femininity and

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The Modern Self is a Reader Self: In Conversation with Bertrand Laverdure and Oana Avasilichioaei

Bertrand Laverdure’s novel, Readopolis, translated by Oana Avasilichioaei, playfully examines the idea that human beings are more connected by their reading abilities than by anything else. Originally published in French as Lectodôme (Le Quartanier, 2008), the novel was critically-acclaimed and was a finalist for the 2009 Grand Prix littéraire Archambault. A review in Le Devoir

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Kicks Just Keep Getting Harder to Find: In Conversation with Stephen Cain

False Friends is the first full-length poetry collection from Stephen Cain in more than ten years. In it, he takes inspiration from the linguistic term “false friends”—two words from different languages that appear to be related, but have fundamentally different meanings. In this book are poems both humourous and unforgiving that Cain uses to explore

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